Croc sighting at Townsville’s Strand Ephemera 2015

Strand Ephemera continues to grow in stature and popularity as the Far North Queensland’s iconic sculpture and arts festival. It was staged over ten days and nights from Friday 31 July until Sunday 9 August 2015, and this year Zest’s award winning 3D chalk artists Jenny McCracken and Rudy Kistler were invited to add an interactive element to the festival.  The festival completely transformed the Strand into an extensive exhibition space for amazing artworks, events, workshops and performances, with some 140,000 people in attendance. The festival is viewed as an important outdoor extension to Townsville’s Perc Tucker Regional Art Gallery, enhancing its reputation for local and international art.

3D TV and lounge roomToxic TV and Broken Smartphones

Week One saw the creation of “Toxic TV”.  Zest Artist Jenny McCracken used 2 surfaces to create the illusion.  The illusion proved to be popular with the public and had people lining up.  Not to miss out Zest’s Rudy Kistler put chalk pastel to the pavement and suddenly a giant Octopus was crawling out a broken smartphone – talk about a smashed screen app!

Crocodile and Starfish swarm The Strand

Jenny McCracken worked with volunteer artists and high school students to create her next masterpiece “…..”   The subject was voted by the public and undoubtedly inspired by recent crocodile sightings…  The 3D illusion proved to be much safer than posing with a real crocodile 😉

Working with school groups of aspiring creative children and youth, Rudy Kistler & Andi Mether created a sea of starfish on ‘The Strand’, which added to the rich array of sculptures on display at the festival. More importantly, it took over 1,200 children on a journey of exploration, discovery, networking and inspiration – allowing them to explore their creative talents working collaboratively with some of Australia’s finest artists.

Zest and the Community

Zest is increasingly being asked to run workshops and bring 3D art to festivals around the country, a testament to the value that this highly accessible and interactive art form brings to cultural and community events. Educators have long been aware of the link between creative pursuits and early cognitive development and Zest is pleased to be able to support and enrich young people’s lives in this way.

Interested in including chalk art in your program?  Contact Andi Mether to find out more.

Crocodile on The Strand, Townsville